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. >> in europe, google faces anti-competition measures. >>> in the united states, ben bernanke gets ready to outline an exit strategy to a skeptical congress. >> a warm welcome to "worldwide exchange." i'm chloe cho in asia. it's just past 5:00 p.m. in singapore. let's check on where the asian markets are wrapping up the trading day. mostly weaker today on the back of weaker consumer confidence numbers. and toyota lows taking the nikkei lower by 1.5%. the hang seng off 0.75%. on the other hand, we have the shanghai composite erasing all of its earlier losses, pushing higher by 1.3%. a lot of speculation in small cap stops and what may be linked to the national people's congress set to kick off next friday. other markets are weaker, the kospi down 1%. the bombay sensex has been trading around the front line. the aussie market asterisk comes off the table, a lot of commodities and resources lower. the s&p/asx 200 down .5%. let's check on the ftse cnbc global 300. slightly off 0.4% at 4,315. good morning, becky. >> good morning. it's about 10:00 on the continent. european markets have been t
. >> in the united states, the spotlight shines today, ben bernanke is back on the hill and president obama's high profile health care summit. >> hello there. a warm welcome to "worldwide exchange." it's chloe cho in asia where it's just past 5:00 p.m. in singapore. a similar scene that we saw as yesterday, of course, investors picking up on bernanke's comments. going forward, could be weak. of course, we had some weak housing numbers, as well, along with disappointing consumer confidence this week. take a look at the damage report. the yen is not helping. nor are the toyota woes. the hang seng, slightly off the shanghai composite. we did have the auction yield on three-month bills along with one-year bills earlier this week that left those yields unchanged. a lot of investors seem to be thinking that perhaps this could be a sign the pboc is taking it easy as far as tightening is concerned. as for the other markets, the kospi down 1.6%. the bombay sensex is pretty much right along the flat line and the aussie market lower by 1.2%, back below that key 4,600 level and take a look at the ftse cnbc gl
with thousands of flights grounded as we speak. >>> fed chairman, ben bernanke laying the groundwork on the central bank's exit strategy for the economic rescue efforts. we've got details of what mr. bernanke said today coming up. >>> but first here's a look at how we finished the day on wall street. the dow jones industrial average under water today. down 21 points on the dow at 10038. under a billion shares traded here on the nyse, as people stayed home, instead of embracing the heavy travel and heavy snow. s&p 500 down 2.5%. quarter of a percent lower at 106 and the nasdaq composite gave up three points and technology one of the winners on the session as was financial services. we get all of the action right now from bertha coombs our floor on the nyse. >> reporter: hey, maria, all things considered it's not a very bad day on the close, even though we closed to the downside. the real factors that kept people hessittant today, the snow of course. that kept volumes lower, but also the uncertainty about where we're headed with greece. this morning, as you take a look at the intraday
, as well, and nursing losses from the federal reserve chief ben bernanke. we've got all the details. christine, we're waiting for the timing. >> that's right. let's see the properties expect of a package for gooes, is it having any impact on the euro right now? euro/dollar, 1.3763. euro is higher against sterling, 0.8841. euro/dollar 1.3763. dollar/yen, standing at 90 evening. a lot of eyes on what will happen with the package. nicole. >> the snowstorm may gone in the i'd, but it's reeking havoc in the east coast, especially in washington. government offices are closed for a fourth straight day at the estimated cost of $100 million in lost productivity. the senate will be back in session this afternoon, but no votes are scheduled. the weekly u.s. inventory data which normally comes out on wednesday has been postponed again until friday. january retail sales in december business inventories which were supposed to come out today have moved to friday. we still get weekly jobless claims at 8:30 new york time and they're forecast to drop by 12,000 to a total of had 68,000. >>> pepsi corp
? >> a lot of speculation about the ecb and real quickly, i just want to mention that the bernanke hearing for tomorrow has been postponed. the expectation is that that is related to weather issues, of course. we've got a big storm coming our way here on the east coast. in the meantime we're looking at a market that's been up triple digits. up 99 and 100 as i speak and this is primarily because there is hope that, in fact, greece's problems may be somewhat tempered by the european union coming in and doing some kind of rescue, some kind of bailout. i want to bring in bob pisani. we've got a lot to talk about, bob. first, bernanke hearing. >> it's just because of the snow, there's nothing else going on. it's that simple and that makes a lot of sense and that's what traders have been saying and we're waiting for an official reason. >> mr. trichet is on his way back from sydney as we speak a day early and a lot of people are putting their hopes on him coming forward with some kind of plan. >> it's actually moved the markets. remember in '92 with the treat they created the whole euro, and gree
by a blueprint coming out from bernanke this week on a plan for credit tightening? >> now, you know, this is the usual thing, nicole, bernanke will come out and he'll have to be careful what he says. he has been saying we'll have an exit policy but not yet. exit policy means look at my finger. higher interest rates. it's like saying the market correctors. was it wrong before? the exit policy is when we're going to see higher interest rates in the united states and of course the markets right now don't want to hear about that. bernanke is saying when the time is appropriate will include interest rates because the markets will want to know when is the appropriate time. can you spell out what's going to happen? the problem is guess what? we're having low unemployment so what if we have low unemployment the month after that? will that be the appropriate signal? >> there we go. andrew freris to stay with us. we'll get you some headlines making news right now. meanwhile, around the world, in the united states, the head of the world's largest bond fund says 2010 will be a year of sovereign
. >> if you want to keep jobs here, you have to find a way to incentivize corporations. bernanke's height rate plan. we will take a look at the policy shift. >> it costs $150 billion a year to treat alzheimer's. medivation is helping find a cure. the stock is up 80% of the year. their ceo joins us about their late stage development drug. >>> the fed is set to unveil its rate hike plan. it is going to be a delicate balancing act for policymakers. steve liesman heads big reporting on this story for weeks, months, maybe years, joins us now with the very latest update. steve, what are they cooking up? >> you know, the question, you know, fed chairman goes to the hill wednesday. the question is whether we will hear anything new from the considerable talk from the fed already about the exit strategies which we reported quite a bit. fed has been transparent about the plans to unwind easy policies. not necessarily in one place. the reason the fed wants to let markets know what it is cooking up for the piece. but afraid too much talk to believe war over the financial cries sis over. the fed does want t
, you have three big concerns. bernanke's confirmation, slowing china growth and obama slapping the banks around in the aftermath of the massachusetts miracle. i think investors have really focused upon those things and have used those skuexcuses to t profit. >> you don't seem to think things are over. we're due for a pullback and maybe the bull market continues? >> you look at fourth quarter earnings right now and i guess we're about halfway through the season. two-thirds of the company have beaten on revenues. you have consensus earnings for s&p that have now moved up to $76 a share. that puts multiple of a 14 times forward earnings. you have core inflation below 2% year over year. 3.6% treasury yield. multiples are too low. you'll see more corporate earnings improvements and stocks will go higher. >> massachusetts miracle? massachusetts disaster maybe. massachusetts tragedy maybe. >> depends on your point of view. >> i guess it does. i want to get that other side in. >> why are you looking at me? phil is the guest. >> i'm sorry. >> jay, what do you think of that scenario? thi
. >> okay let's talk about what went on this week, glenn, as ben bernanke addressed congressional commit these week. there's been so much attention focused on the fed and how they will unwind all of the monetary support that they've put into place to support the economy. last week the fed increasing that discount rate. what are your thoughts on the move so far? how much longer can the fed keep the rates as low as they are and still manage an exit strategy. >> i think that chairman bernanke said it well when he said that the fed would need to keep rates lo, certainly for most of this year. i think the balance sheet adjustments would happen before any formal changes in the federal funds rate. the real questions on an exit strategy aren't economic and technical. they're political. because the fed would have to unwind portfolios, things like mortgage-backed securities, long-term treasuries. that requires political courage, but i have every faith in the federal reserve that it can do this. >> let me ask you in terms of the administration in terms of the stimulus. they're talking about save, c
. people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke gave us the largest downturn since the great depression. that is why we have a huge budget deficit. we didn't have a huge tax cuts. we had stimulus and response to the downturn. we have higher unemployment if we have not had that but let's be clear if we are upset about the deficit greenspan and bernanke, i don't know why we reappointed bernanke. in terms of the entitlement programs, yeah we have a public pension program, which is hugely popular. you look at polling day that-- i was at a conference this morning in social security is over 90%. they ask people would you be willing to pay higher taxes to sustain sosa security benefits and 70 to 80% said yes. i don't see any problem with running a pension program through the public sector. what is the problem with the? it is usually popular. health care costs, medicare again. we are providing medicare health care benefits for seniors. that is also hugely popular. you have these tea party people out there yelling don't let the government touch medicare. they are anti-government but they want me
. and with dr. bernanke scheduled to speak tomorrow, our sense is that that trade will be relatively quiet here. a high volume area last week was around 1064 even. we'll probably bing bong back and forth on that trade waiting for dr. bernanke or for further developments in europe. >> what's your view, jamie, about today's trade and whether you believe in the bounce we are likely to get, at least at the open? >> well, i think the most encouraging part is that this rally is coming from european financials. you can see all those works up markedly on yesterday's trade. domestically, local ibs have been overwhelmed by this european crisis. unemployment was a great number on friday. it exceeded expectations. earnings continue to be strong. we seem to have been weighed down by euro. if that turn around and those financials continue to hold these gains, it could be very good things domestically. >> jamie, most of the guys you trade with trade according to technical analysis charts and yada yada. let me run this by you. the day before yesterday, which was a monday, right? yeah. did monday look like a sh
. people still point to may of '07 when bernanke says subprime is 9% of mortgages, right? they're not infallible. and we can't expect them to be, i guess, is the answer, right? >> none of us is infallible. if you didn't learn that, you missed something over the course of the past three years. >> dan's with us for the rest of the program. we've got a lot more to talk about. >>> meantime, any questions or comments this morning, we'd love to hear from you. our address is squawk@cnbc.com. >>> when we come back, european exposure, debt crisis overseas, how some u.s. companies might be impacted. >>> still to come, olympic skiers headed to the starting gate at whistler while bankers in new york await a possible auction. we'll get an update from daniel nu mudd, the ceo of fortress, just ahead. >>> time now for today's "aflac trivia question." what baseball player nicknamed the georgia peach amassed 4,189 hits in his career? this is not more benefits at greater cost to your company insurance. this is not how does it fit in my company's budget insurance. this is help protect and care for
several members would like the asset sales in the near 5 but ben bernanke made it clear last week in his text not likely to be part of the initial exit strategy, not likely in 2010. it's all about timing in actions. now to that end, you can see clearly on the intraday, ten-year chart that rates did pop a bit on that. they were already somewhat elevated but they moderated, but from a technical vantage point open that up chart to one month and you can see kr this area is important. snugging up against the top of a trading range established over the last month. we haven't closed above 375 in basically a month. as far as the dollar, well, today reversed all of yesterday's, matter of fact the dollar up over two-thirds a cent. host to of those gains coming in a combination of the eurocurrency and having a big day against the yen. maria, back to you. >> all right, rick, thanks very much. and you mentioned, really, one of the stories of the day, rick, and that really is that some policymakers are talking about starting to sell assets in the near term versus others who are favoring a more gradual
for banks in the country. host: ben bernanke referred yesterday to short-term political liability for this. guest: i think he is absolutely correct. people tend, under these kinds of conditions, to one to blame someone. the problem with that is there are plenty of people to blame. we deregulated the industry. the congress deregulated the industry. there was a culture, if you will, of deregulation. and this encouraged some of what i call speculative activities that led to the bubbles and then the collapse. yes, you had this reaction. i think it is an overreaction, and the outcome would be -- as you try to blame someone you get worse outcomes rather than better outcomes, and i think that is what the chairman was trying to communicate. host: does the banking committee and the members, are they right to be angry at the fete at all? guest: if they're going to be angry, i think they have to be angry at everyone, including themselves. they allow these organizations to get bigger and more risk oriented. and yes, and regulatory agencies because of this culture -- the regulatory agencies because of
. bernanke. -- thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] ♪ >> we have quite a lineup on this isle. only a couple on the other. we need a few more folks down here. we've already had to pull some day -- a fulsome day. let's proceed to our question and answer session. we have three other excellent speakers, so a lot to look forward to. i want the banking for coming and your excellent attention. this is our fifth symposium and they seem to get better every year, if that is indeed possible. thank you all for making this such a productive in event. all right, we will begin with our question and answer is, and because there are more of you then of view, we're going to start on this side. >> this is a question for mr. kantor. and cultural prophets redeem themselves with accurate insights? >> i am not sure that i understand the question. >> you are talking about cultural prophesied and you believe that they cannot predict accurately. but can the kid rick -- redeem themselves? >> i am not sure what you mean by t
that of course was going to burst, and this is why i get mad at people like alan greenspan and ben bernanke and most economists because god knows what on earth was going through their heads in the year 2003 to those of four cardinals five, 2006, to dozens of as the bubble could growing and growing and the savitt is okay and now they are surprised who could have known that is the joke we have or not washington they run around saying who could have known? anyone doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes, anything you want to address? >> guest: i think it's important of the interplay and the war and domestic policy because when you have -- it's true the government can't think about two things at once. it can't walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction whether you believe it's something we should invest in, afghanistan, iraq or not the government doesn't think well what is going on at home so if he would have called on our various leaders at the fed or the white house over time under -- in this purpose it would be under president bush postsecondary 11th h
as a country to have in place, hank, ben bernanke kumbaya tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people and finance and business and government. i cannot think of for that would have done a better job. but to look back of our country's financial system throes of during that period. some of you were in a party i was that in 2008 when the talk, when you have 3.5 four more trillion held by 30 million people on a sunday night are worried about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all deposits held in the banks at that time. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies described in the book worried if they would be payable in a short period of time. the sixth largest bank in the country with the maastricht staged domestic deposits and the third largest bank, wachovia, i needed a shotgun marriage on a monday morning and it just arrived this. interestingly the bookstores early september when fannie mae and freddie mac worry essentially bart -- broke. the two institutions guaranteed 40 percent of all res
:00. >> thank you and welcome chairman bernanke. Ñi i'm interested in the suggestion made recently about curtailing some of the investment banking risks they are taking. he brings up an important subject and touches on it. it's bigger than what he has addressed. when we repealed against ñrthis i also believe there's been a moral has order caused by a fra decision of a line of credit given to freddie mac. the concept still persists that it is too big to fail. nobody is going to walk away. there's this dpar untea that the government will be there to bail out anybody that looks like is going to shake it up. it doesn't matter the bad debt and burden on the american taxpayer. it is still there. creating a tremendous moral hazard. the real problem over the decades has been the perception put into the markets pretending there is a saveings ore actually capital out there. this is the moral hazard because they believe something that is not true. we see the disintegration of the system we have already created. we have already been in a final crisis. we are going to see this get worse and have to
corps which western intelligence believes is peterheading iran's missile program. ben bernanke is outlining the central bank's plan for reeling in stimulus money once the economic recovery is more firmly rooted. the a p rights in prepared remarks to the house committee mr. burning pieces the fed will start tightening credit by boosting the interest rate it pays banks at the central bank. to an in to booktv for a three day president's day weekend beginning saturday. others inform treasury secretary henry paulson talking with warren buffett on the 2008 economic collapse. afterwards, historian and pulitzer prize winner gary wills on how the atomic bomb change the presidency and the role of the u.s. in the world. all day monday, books on american presidents. fdr, as seen on president obama and our culture on ronald reagan. for the complete schedule go to booktv.org. . it is a little under two hours. >> meeting come to order. mahatghghandi, every worthwhile accomplishment has stages drudgery and triumph. in beginning struggle and victory. the effort to add comprehensive health care
bush, ben bernanke, tim geithner to get the record out. this is news in and of itself, michelle, beyond the details you point out. his first-person account goes into the record and it's going to be essential to figure out where did we go wrong and how do we fix it? amazing to me the number of things that aren't fixed yet. >> final thought to you? >> i agree with steve. it was remarkable book. it helps the history exicle record. i call it pg version. he said the british screwed us. in my book he uses a colorful phrase. >> andrew, thank you. steve, thank you. the word on the street goldman sachs' ceo lloyd blankfein could collect a bonus up to $100 million according to the report in the times of london. goldman sachs roundly distribpu the rumor saying there's speculation and there's stupidity. this speculation transcends the stupid and takes it to a new level. i would call that -- that would be your denial-denial. >> that would be a strong denial. goldman sachs shares gaining 90% for a year and about 4% higher right now. the goldman sachs folks knocked this story down. it is only in the t
get so mad at people like ben bernanke. most economists, god knows what on earth was going through their heads as they watch the bubble keep grow and grow and grow and said everything was okay. now they are surprised fukuda agnone? that is a joke we have around washington. anyone who is doing their job should have known. >> host: amity shlaes anything there you want to address? >> guest: i think it is important to think about the interplay between the war in domestic policy because it is true the government can think about two things at once. it cannot walk and chew gum at the same time and when you have a distraction, whether you believe it is something we should invest then, afghanistan, iraq, the government does not think well about what is going on at home so if you called on our various leaders that the fed or at the white house over time under, in this period under president bush,'s september 11 you would say are you concerned about fannie mae? they would say absolutely, here's the data and they are going out of control, fannie and freddie and we will be have legislation abou
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
benefits expire isn't going to garner bipartisan support. extending -- bernanke jobs version when the president was asked about when he was here asked about mitch mcconnell talking about how they can support, republicans can support nuclear energy and the president's response was, i'm paraphrasing but of course they like those are republican ideas offering in the name of bipartisanship and what's going on here is the reverse, harry reid taking out the one democratic idea. >> do you think helping small businesses grow by allowing them to write off their expenditures is going to -- something that is a democratic idea? you think that the highway trust fund extension is a uniquely space space idea? if you were to break the components of that bill individually each of those would donner strong bipartisan support. so,, i think we are in some ways over reading some of this because again, i think personally i believe that the components of this bill, several components that were in the bipartisan bill but are not in the reid bill will still be bipartisan. i think -- i don't think any of t
together with bernanke's exit speech, you put that together and people say, wait a second, maybe the tight is turning. and being on top of the timing of when the fed starts to tighten or when the rhetoric changes, because when the rhetoric changes, that's when rates will change. and if there weren't enough international news, the european central bank plans to join forces of the european commission to monitor the situation in greece. ecb president jean-claude trichet says the two will draw up necessary measures to maintain stability in the euro zone. european officials offered support for debt-laden greece at a summit yesterday. we don't know what's in the plan. it's some sort of support. >> i don't know what the plan is. except everybody is happy they're in a plan. >> they're in something. they've expressed support. >> monday, the finance ministers meet again. this may be a situation where you see more of the details that start to emerge. what's it call, the european -- the meeting on monday. >> what worries me is that the plan itself will be so underwell manying that people will say, is
. on the currency's i would only say that, ay that, as you know,n bernanke and tim geithner are saying in the interest of the united states. the other major currencies. i say myself i fully agree it is in the interest of the united states. i would also say that it corresponds to the overall superior interests of the group the so what this say. i would also said that as a major floating currencies we have members of other currencies that could themselves have a progressive and orderly and timely appreciation. that is the way i see the running of the present situation. we could imagine other solutions, of course. they said to have a floating major currencies. >> other questions? yes, sir. in the front row. >> every country has its own problems and its own solutions. how do you see? what would be the challenge is to iraq ? thank you. >> peter. >> well, it is a good point. i wish i was more confident that it would succeed. it is very important to succeed. it is very important we continue to progress, but i am not expecting is to suddenly become easy. even the process of trying to make it h
, some news today. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told the senate banking committee today and his second day of testimony on capitol hill this week that interest rates will have to stay low for a lengthy period to counter a weak job market. the u.s. central bank chief prepared remarks were virtually identical to those delivered yesterday to the house financial services committee. and cheaper nike also told lawmakers that goldman sachs and other wall street firms may be looking into a sophisticated instrument investment instrument to make bets that greece will default on its debts. also about the healthcare summit which you can see live on c-span3 and c-span.org, a story from yahoo news saying that a consensus on how to rein in spiraling healthcare costs seem to be emerging as president obama some that the president agreed with assertions by oklahoma republican senator tom coburn that abuse them out account up to a third of the cost of a time of programs like medicare and medicaid. and is a major barrier to worldwide insurance coverage. senator coburn said that the cost is the chie
. host: a couple other items, business section of "new york times," that ben bernanke has survived a challenge to his second term as chairman, and faces the delicate task of beginning to pull the central bank out of its extraordinary situation. guest: the economy through the fall of 2008 and through last year, in an effort to help banks and credit markets and to prevent the financial system from imploding. they did that by lower the interest rates, and now they have to pull that back. they have to pull the federal reserves investments in the economy back. and they have to do that carefully because they don't want to cause problems in doing so, which is something that could happen. it will be delicate. markets are watching when this will happen. if he doesn't do it right, you will see plunges in stock values. host: what is the update? guest: last week senate dodd announced he was at an impasse with senator shelby, and it's not a good sign. there are some republicans who said they were committed to get a bill. one thing to watch is bob corker, a new senator from tennessee, he's worki
, as you know, ben bernanke and tim geithner are saying a strong dollar is in the interests of the united states, in relation to the other major floating currencies. i say myself, on my part, i fully agree. a strong dollar is in the interests of the united states. i would also say that it corresponds to the overall superiority interest of the global economy as a whole, and certainly of the interest of europe. i echo what they say. i would also say that, as major floating currencies, we have the sentiment that a number of other currencies that are not floating could themselves have a progressive and orderly and timely appreciation. that is the way i see the running of the present situation. in the very long run, we could imagine other solutions, but at the present moment we are running a set of free floating major currencies, and there you have the terms of reference that we agree upon. >> another question? yes, sir. in the front row. >> while every country has its own problems and is thinking of its own solution, how do you see the doha round will succeed? if it would not, what would be t
today. >>> meantime, making headlines in the business world, fed chief ben bernanke back on capitol hill telling the senate committee that the central bank is looking into whether u.s. you banks worsened greece's debt crisis. some u.s. banks are said to use complicated currency swap to help greece understate the debt problems betting thalt country would default on its debt. coming up tomorrow, friday on wall street, we'll get key reports, consumer sentiment, existing home sales, also a revised reading on fourth quarter gdp, the final day of the trading week. >>> a lot of questions today about why a killer whale at seaworld turned on its trainer. next jane velez-mitchell host of "issues" will give her take on this tragic incident. don't go anywhere. >>> 40-year-old dawn brancheau was one of the most experienced trainers at orlando seaworld. her death is a shock to her co-workers and park visitors who saw this happen yesterday. a killer whale named tilikum dragged her under water at the end of a performance in the shamu stadium. audience members said, at first it just seemed like it was pa
and country and dodge grand caravan vehicles. >>> well, fed chairman ben bernanke told congress wednesday that interest rates will remain low to support continued economic growth. >>> and the house is now set to vote on a jobs bill after the full senate passed the $15 billion measure on wednesday. >>> and just today after being released from a washington, d.c., hospital after suffering a heart attack, former vice president dick cheney is having coffee today with his former boss, president george w. bush. it is the first time the two have seen each other since they left office. >>> and a close call this week for an officer in michigan who was on the side of the road with a driver when another car came barreling towards him. he managed to jump to avoid being pinned, and amazingly, suffered only minor injuries. it is 7:15. let's head back now to matt, meredith, ann and al. >> all right, thanks, amy. >> seems like we've got just nasty weather across the whole continent. >> that's right. >> snowing and nasty in the northeast. >> but it just stopped here. >> and that's not the only place. we've
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)